Kama sex

540+ Sex Positions

Climb on top of your cutie and take control with these sizzling sex positions, complete with steamy illustrations and step-by-step instructions. The Kama Sutra is an ancient Indian Sanskrit text on sexuality, eroticism and emotional fulfillment in. These are the only Kama Sutra sex positions you need to know about.

The Kama Sutra is an ancient Indian Sanskrit text on sexuality, eroticism and emotional fulfillment in. Host Rebecca Rosenblat, a Certified Therapist, answers your sex & relationship questions in Hindi. Sure, we'll teach you a few easy Kama Sutra positions, but you'll also learn that this text is about so much more than sex!

Climb on top of your cutie and take control with these sizzling sex positions, complete with steamy illustrations and step-by-step instructions. These are the only Kama Sutra sex positions you need to know about. Watch Sex Sent Me to the ER Fridays 9/8c. | For more, visit escortfinsbury.info​shows/sex-sent-me-to-the-er Watch full episodes!






Kamasutra is the oldest surviving Hindu text on erotic love. The text is a mix of prose and anustubh -meter poetry verses. The text acknowledges the Hindu concept of Purusharthasand lists desire, sexuality, and emotional fulfillment as one of sex proper goals of life.

Its chapters discuss methods for courtship, training in the arts to be socially engaging, finding a partner, flirting, maintaining power in a married life, when and how to commit adultery, sexual positions, and other topics. The text is one of many Indian texts on Kama Shastra. The Kamasutra has influenced many secondary texts that followed after the 4th-century CE, as well as the Indian arts swx exemplified by the pervasive presence Kama-related reliefs and sculpture in old Hindu temples.

This first European edition by Burton does not faithfully reflect much in the Kamasutra because he revised the collaborative translation by Bhagavanlal Indrajit and Shivaram Parashuram Bhide with Forster Arbuthnot to suit 19th-century Victorian tastes.

The original composition date or century for the Kamasutra is unknown. For these reasons, she dates the Kama sutra to the second half of the 3rd-century CE. The place of its composition is also unclear. The likely candidates are urban centers of north or northwest ancient India, alternatively in the eastern urban Pataliputra now Patna.

Vatsyayana Mallanaga is its widely accepted author because his name is embedded in the colophon verse, but little is known about him. This suggests he lived before the 5th-century CE. The Hindu tradition has the concept of the Purusharthas which outlines "four main goals of life". Each of these pursuits became a subject of study and led to prolific Sanskrit and some Prakrit languages literature in ancient India. Along with Dharmasastras, Arthasastras and Mokshasastras, the Kamasastras genre have been preserved in palm leaf manuscripts.

The Kamasutra belongs to the Kamasastra genre of texts. Other examples of Hindu Sanskrit texts on sexuality and emotions include the Ratirahasya called Kokashastra in srx Indian scriptsthe Anangarangathe Nagarasarvasvathe Kandarpachudmaniand the Panchasayaka.

He makes a passing mention of the fourth aim of life in some verses. The earliest foundations of the kamasutra are found in the Vedic era literature of Hinduism.

Auddalaki is an early Upanishadic rishi scholar-poet, sagewhose ideas are found in the Brihadaranyaka Upanishad such as in section 6. Among with other ideas such as Atman self, soul and the ontological kama of Brahmanthese early Upanishads sex human life, activities and the nature of existence as a form of internalized worship, where sexuality and sex is mapped into a esx of religious yajna ritual sacrificial fire, Agni and suffused in spiritual terms: [41].

A fire — that is what a woman is, Gautama. Her firewood is the vulva, her smoke is the pubic hair, her flame is the vagina, when one penetrates her, that is her embers, and her sparks kama the climax. In that very fire the gods offer semen, and from that offering springs a man. According to the Indologist De, a view with which Doniger agrees, this is one of the many evidences that the kamasutra began in the religious literature of the Vedic era, ideas that were ultimately refined and distilled into a sutra -genre text by Vatsyayana.

Human relationships, sex and emotional kama are a significant part of the post-Vedic Sanskrit literature such as the major Hindu epics: the Mahabharata and the Ramayana. The ancient Indian view has been, states Johann Kamq, that love and sex are a delightful necessity. Though she is reserved and selective, "a woman stands in very great need of surata amorous or sexual pleasure ", and "the woman has a far stronger erotic disposition, her delight in the sexual act is greater than a man's".

The Kamasutra manuscripts have survived in many versions across the Indian subcontinent. While sexx to get a translation of the Sanskrit kama-sastra text Anangaranga that had already been widely translated by the Hindus in regional languages such as Marathi, associates of the British Orientalist Richard Burton stumbled into portions sex the Kamasutra manuscript.

They commissioned the Sanskrit scholar Bhagvanlal Indraji to locate a complete Kamasutra manuscript and translate it. Indraji collected variant manuscripts in libraries and temples of Varanasi, Kolkata and Jaipur. Burton published an edited English translation of these manuscripts, but kxma a critical edition of the Kamasutra in Sanskrit.

According to Ka,a. Upadhyaya, known for his scholarly study and a more accurate translation of the Kamasutrathere are issues with the manuscripts that have survived and the text likely underwent revisions over time. Vatsyayana's Kama Sutra states it has verses, distributed over 36 chapters in 64 sections, organised into 7 books. The Kamasutra uses a mixture of prose and poetry, and the narration has the form of a dramatic fiction where two characters are called the nayaka man and nayika womanaided by the characters called pitamarda libertinevita pander and vidushaka jester.

This format follows the teachings found in the Sanskrit classic named kama Natyasastra. In kama period of life in which one of the elements of the trivarga — dharma, artha, kama — is the primary one, the other two should be natural adjuncts of it. Under no circumstances, any one of the trivarga should be detrimental to the other two. Across human cultures, states Michel Foucault, "the truth of sex" has been produced and shared by two processes.

One method has been ars erotica texts, while the other has been the scientia sexualis literature. The first are typically of the hidden variety and shared by one person to another, between friends or from a master to a student, focusing on the emotions and experience, sans physiology. These bury many of sex truths about sex and human sexual nature.

It discusses, in its distilled form, the physiology, the emotions and the experience while citing and quoting prior Sanskrit scholarship on the nature of kama. The Kamasutra is a " sutra "-genre text consisting of intensely condensed, aphoristic verses.

Doniger describes them as a "kind of atomic string thread of meanings", which are so cryptic that any translation is more like deciphering and filling in the text. In the colonial era marked by sexual censorship, the Kamasutra became famous as a pirated and underground text for its explicit description of sex positions. The stereotypical image of the text is one where erotic pursuit with sexual intercourse include improbable contortionist forms.

It is also a psychological treatise that presents the effect of desire and pleasure on human behavior. For each aspect of Kamamama Kamasutra presents a diverse spectrum of options and regional practices. Eex to Shastri, as quoted by Doniger, the text analyses "the inclinations of men, good and bad", thereafter it presents Vatsyayana's recommendation and arguments kama what one must sex as well as what to not miss in experiencing and enjoying, with "acting only on the good".

The text, according to Doniger, clearly states "that a treatise demands the inclusion of everything, good or bad", but sx being informed with in-depth knowledge, one must "reflect and accept only the good".

The approach found in the text is kamq where goals of science and religion should not be to repress, but to encyclopedically know and understand, thereafter let the individual make the choice. The 3rd-century text includes a number of themes, including subjects such as flirting that resonate in the modern era context, states a New York Times review.

In the party, a poem should be read with parts sex, and the guests should compete to creatively complete the poem. The boy should dive into the water away from the girl he is interested in, then swim underwater to get close to her, emerge from the water sex surprise her, touch her slightly and then dive again, away from her.

Book 3 of the Kamasutra is largely dedicated to the art of kma with the aim of marriage. The book's opening verse declares marriage to be a conducive means to "a pure and natural love between the partners", states Upadhyaya. It suggests involving one's friends and relatives in the search, and meeting the current friends and relatives of one's future partner prior to the marriage.

Vatsyayana recommends, states Kams Danielou, that "one should play, marry, associate with one's equals, kama of one's own circle" who share the same values and religious outlook. It is more difficult to manage a good, happy relationship when there are basic differences between the two, according to verse 3. Vatsyayana's Kamasutra describes intimacy of various forms, including those between lovers before and during sex. For example, the text discusses eight forms of alingana embrace in verses 2.

The last four are forms of embrace recommended by Vatsyayana to increase pleasure during foreplay sex during sexual intimacy. Vatsyayana cites earlier — now lost — Indian texts from the Babhraya's school, for these eight categories of embraces. The various forms of intimacy reflect the ka,a and provide means to engage a combination of senses for pleasure. For instance, according to Vatsyayana the lalatika form enables both to feel each other and allows the man to visually appreciate "the full beauty of sex female form", states S.

Some sexual embraces, not in this text, also intensify passion; these, too, may be used for love-making, but only with care. The territory of the text extends only so far as men have dull appetites; but when the wheel of sexual ecstasy is in full motion, there is no textbook at all, and no order. Another example of the kams of intimacy discussed in the Kamasutra includes chumbanas kissing. Vatsyayana also mentions variations in kissing cultures in different parts of ancient India.

During sex, the text recommends going with the flow and mirroring with abhiyoga and samprayoga. Other techniques kama foreplay and sexual intimacy described in the kamasutra include various forms of holding and embraces grahanaupaguhanamutual massage and rubbing mardanapinching and biting, using fingers and hands to stimulate karikarakrida sx, nadi-kshobanaanguli-praveshathree styles of jihva-pravesha french kissingand many styles of fellatio and cunnlingus.

The Kamasutrastates the Indologist and Sanskrit literature scholar Ludo Rocher kkama, discourages eex but then devotes kzma less than fifteen sutras 1. According to Doniger, the Kamasutra teaches adulterous sexual liaison as a means for a man to predispose the involved woman in assisting him, as a strategic means to work against his enemies and to facilitate his successes.

It also explains the signs and reasons a woman wants to enter into an adulterous relationship and when she does not want to commit adultery.

The Kamasutra has been one of the unique sources of sociological information and cultural milieu of ancient India. It shows a "near total disregard of class varna and caste jati ", states Doniger.

In the pages of the Kamasutralovers are "not upper-class" but they "must be rich" enough to dress well, pursue social leisure activities, buy gifts and surprise the lover. In the rare mention of caste found in the text, it is about a man finding his legal wife and the advice that humorous stories to seduce a woman should be about "other virgins of same jati caste ".

In general, the text describes sexual activity between men and women across class and caste, both in urban and rural settings. The Kamasutra includes verses describing homosexual relations such as oral sex between two men, as well as between two women. According to Doniger, the Kamasutra discusses same-sex relationships through the notion of the tritiya prakritiliterally, "third sexuality" or "third nature". In Redeeming the Kamasutra, Doniger states kam "the Kamasutra departs from the dharmic view of homosexuality in significant ways", where the term kliba appears.

In contemporary translations, this has been inaccurately rendered as "eunuch" — or, a castrated man in a harem, [note 1] a practice that started in India after the arrival of Turkish Sultans. The Kamasutra does not use the pejorative term kliba at all, but speaks instead of a "third kaama or, sex the sexual behavior context as the "third sexuality". The text states that there are two sorts of "third nature", one where a man behaves like a woman, and in the other, a woman behaves like a man.

In one of the longest consecutive sets of verses describing a sexual act, the Kamasutra describes fellatio technique between a man dressed like a woman performing fellatio on another man. The Kamasutra also mentions "pretend play" sadomasochism, [91] [92] and kkama sex. The historical records suggest that the Kamasutra was a well-known and popular text in Indian history, states Wendy Doniger.

This popularity through the Mughal Empire era is confirmed by its regional translations. The Mughals, states Doniger, had "commissioned lavishly illustrated Persian and Sanskrit Kamasutra manuscripts". He did not translate it, but did edit it to suit the Victorian British attitudes. The unedited translation was produced by the Indian scholar Bhagwan Lal Kama with the assistance of a student Shivaram Parshuram Bhide, under the guidance of Burton's friend, the Indian civil servant Forster Fitzgerald Arbuthnot.

The Burton version of the Kamasutra was produced in an environment where Victorian mindset and Protestant proselytizers were busy finding faults and attacking Kama and its culture, rejecting as "filthy paganism" anything sensuous and sexual in Hindu arts and literature. The "Hindus kama cowering under their scorn", states Doniger, and the open discussion of srx in the Kamasutra scandalized the 19th-century Europeans.

Yet, states Doniger, it became soon after its publication in"one of the most pirated books in the English language", widely copied, reprinted and republished sometimes without Richard Burton's name.

The Kama Sutra was written with three objectives in mind: dharma, artha, and kama:. Despite this however, the takeaway for many is that the text was a manual solely made for sexual pleasure. By now, you know that the Kama Sutra is not just a text about sexual pleasure. Book One: Sadharana General Book one is a mere introduction, teaching the reader about the three life objectives: dharma, artha, and kama. Book Two: Samprayogika Embracing This is the more commonly-known book, as it pertains to sex.

It talks about the different kinds of love, the forces of desire , kissing , 65 sexual positions, how a woman should perform oral sex, and other acts of a sexual nature. It also talks about how men can approach women even those who are not their own wife , and how to keep their wife.

Book Six: Vaisika Courtesans This text is about the different types of courtesans, the characteristics of a man that will attract women, how a man should behave and live, and how to attain wealth. It also talks about how to spot a partner that is losing interest, how to rekindle with an old lover, how to handle gains and losses, and how to deal with doubt.

And unlike Christianity that says that sex serves as a means of procreation, Hindus believe that the act and enjoyment of sexual activity is important in every day life.

Interestingly, and despite it being written over 2, years ago, the text is oddly liberal, giving women the freedom to choose their own partners — be it for marriage or sex and extramarital affairs. Today, this kind of liberal thinking, especially in countries like Saudi Arabia, is completely unheard of, making the Kama Sutra an interesting text and journey into traditional ways of life in the second century.

That is, sexual positions. Here are five positions from the Kama Sutra that just about anyone can enjoy, regardless of your flexibility or fitness level. In this position, the woman should be laying on her back with her legs open, and the man will simply enter her. Why is this in the Kama Sutra list of sex positions? With the woman on her back cradling her knees, the man will kneel in front and enter her.

Aka, reverse cowgirl. This is a Kama Sutra position for the way in which it makes a woman feel —powerful. She has control, and the man has a pretty great view while being ridden. This one gives the woman an opportunity to stimulate her clit , which is always a plus. The woman will get on top facing away, and start riding into the sunset.

This cunnilingus pose requires the man to lay on his back with his knees propped up while the woman then lays on top of him. The man can use pillows to assist his head more closely to the vagina for an optimum eating-out scenario. Ever heard of being a power-bottom? This is a step up from missionary , with the woman laying on her back and the man face-down on top of her, but — what makes this position different is that the woman props one of her knees up to the side of his body, and wraps the other leg around his body to meet the outside of her other knee.

It gives her total control to squeeze in some extra intimacy. This allows for deeper penetration, especially if the man is less endowed. The man is sitting with his feet under his bottom while the woman is laying with her bottom on his crotch and legs over his shoulders. Remember wheelbarrow races in elementary school? This format follows the teachings found in the Sanskrit classic named the Natyasastra.

In any period of life in which one of the elements of the trivarga — dharma, artha, kama — is the primary one, the other two should be natural adjuncts of it. Under no circumstances, any one of the trivarga should be detrimental to the other two.

Across human cultures, states Michel Foucault, "the truth of sex" has been produced and shared by two processes. One method has been ars erotica texts, while the other has been the scientia sexualis literature. The first are typically of the hidden variety and shared by one person to another, between friends or from a master to a student, focusing on the emotions and experience, sans physiology.

These bury many of the truths about sex and human sexual nature. It discusses, in its distilled form, the physiology, the emotions and the experience while citing and quoting prior Sanskrit scholarship on the nature of kama.

The Kamasutra is a " sutra "-genre text consisting of intensely condensed, aphoristic verses. Doniger describes them as a "kind of atomic string thread of meanings", which are so cryptic that any translation is more like deciphering and filling in the text. In the colonial era marked by sexual censorship, the Kamasutra became famous as a pirated and underground text for its explicit description of sex positions.

The stereotypical image of the text is one where erotic pursuit with sexual intercourse include improbable contortionist forms. It is also a psychological treatise that presents the effect of desire and pleasure on human behavior. For each aspect of Kama , the Kamasutra presents a diverse spectrum of options and regional practices.

According to Shastri, as quoted by Doniger, the text analyses "the inclinations of men, good and bad", thereafter it presents Vatsyayana's recommendation and arguments of what one must avoid as well as what to not miss in experiencing and enjoying, with "acting only on the good". The text, according to Doniger, clearly states "that a treatise demands the inclusion of everything, good or bad", but after being informed with in-depth knowledge, one must "reflect and accept only the good".

The approach found in the text is one where goals of science and religion should not be to repress, but to encyclopedically know and understand, thereafter let the individual make the choice. The 3rd-century text includes a number of themes, including subjects such as flirting that resonate in the modern era context, states a New York Times review.

In the party, a poem should be read with parts missing, and the guests should compete to creatively complete the poem. The boy should dive into the water away from the girl he is interested in, then swim underwater to get close to her, emerge from the water and surprise her, touch her slightly and then dive again, away from her.

Book 3 of the Kamasutra is largely dedicated to the art of courtship with the aim of marriage. The book's opening verse declares marriage to be a conducive means to "a pure and natural love between the partners", states Upadhyaya. It suggests involving one's friends and relatives in the search, and meeting the current friends and relatives of one's future partner prior to the marriage.

Vatsyayana recommends, states Alain Danielou, that "one should play, marry, associate with one's equals, people of one's own circle" who share the same values and religious outlook. It is more difficult to manage a good, happy relationship when there are basic differences between the two, according to verse 3.

Vatsyayana's Kamasutra describes intimacy of various forms, including those between lovers before and during sex. For example, the text discusses eight forms of alingana embrace in verses 2. The last four are forms of embrace recommended by Vatsyayana to increase pleasure during foreplay and during sexual intimacy. Vatsyayana cites earlier — now lost — Indian texts from the Babhraya's school, for these eight categories of embraces. The various forms of intimacy reflect the intent and provide means to engage a combination of senses for pleasure.

For instance, according to Vatsyayana the lalatika form enables both to feel each other and allows the man to visually appreciate "the full beauty of the female form", states S. Some sexual embraces, not in this text, also intensify passion; these, too, may be used for love-making, but only with care. The territory of the text extends only so far as men have dull appetites; but when the wheel of sexual ecstasy is in full motion, there is no textbook at all, and no order.

Another example of the forms of intimacy discussed in the Kamasutra includes chumbanas kissing. Vatsyayana also mentions variations in kissing cultures in different parts of ancient India. During sex, the text recommends going with the flow and mirroring with abhiyoga and samprayoga.

Other techniques of foreplay and sexual intimacy described in the kamasutra include various forms of holding and embraces grahana , upaguhana , mutual massage and rubbing mardana , pinching and biting, using fingers and hands to stimulate karikarakrida , nadi-kshobana , anguli-pravesha , three styles of jihva-pravesha french kissing , and many styles of fellatio and cunnlingus.

The Kamasutra , states the Indologist and Sanskrit literature scholar Ludo Rocher , discourages adultery but then devotes "not less than fifteen sutras 1. According to Doniger, the Kamasutra teaches adulterous sexual liaison as a means for a man to predispose the involved woman in assisting him, as a strategic means to work against his enemies and to facilitate his successes.

It also explains the signs and reasons a woman wants to enter into an adulterous relationship and when she does not want to commit adultery. The Kamasutra has been one of the unique sources of sociological information and cultural milieu of ancient India. It shows a "near total disregard of class varna and caste jati ", states Doniger. In the pages of the Kamasutra , lovers are "not upper-class" but they "must be rich" enough to dress well, pursue social leisure activities, buy gifts and surprise the lover.

In the rare mention of caste found in the text, it is about a man finding his legal wife and the advice that humorous stories to seduce a woman should be about "other virgins of same jati caste ". In general, the text describes sexual activity between men and women across class and caste, both in urban and rural settings. The Kamasutra includes verses describing homosexual relations such as oral sex between two men, as well as between two women. According to Doniger, the Kamasutra discusses same-sex relationships through the notion of the tritiya prakriti , literally, "third sexuality" or "third nature".

In Redeeming the Kamasutra, Doniger states that "the Kamasutra departs from the dharmic view of homosexuality in significant ways", where the term kliba appears. In contemporary translations, this has been inaccurately rendered as "eunuch" — or, a castrated man in a harem, [note 1] a practice that started in India after the arrival of Turkish Sultans.

The Kamasutra does not use the pejorative term kliba at all, but speaks instead of a "third nature" or, in the sexual behavior context as the "third sexuality". The text states that there are two sorts of "third nature", one where a man behaves like a woman, and in the other, a woman behaves like a man.

In one of the longest consecutive sets of verses describing a sexual act, the Kamasutra describes fellatio technique between a man dressed like a woman performing fellatio on another man. The Kamasutra also mentions "pretend play" sadomasochism, [91] [92] and group sex. The historical records suggest that the Kamasutra was a well-known and popular text in Indian history, states Wendy Doniger.

This popularity through the Mughal Empire era is confirmed by its regional translations. The Mughals, states Doniger, had "commissioned lavishly illustrated Persian and Sanskrit Kamasutra manuscripts". He did not translate it, but did edit it to suit the Victorian British attitudes.

The unedited translation was produced by the Indian scholar Bhagwan Lal Indraji with the assistance of a student Shivaram Parshuram Bhide, under the guidance of Burton's friend, the Indian civil servant Forster Fitzgerald Arbuthnot. The Burton version of the Kamasutra was produced in an environment where Victorian mindset and Protestant proselytizers were busy finding faults and attacking Hinduism and its culture, rejecting as "filthy paganism" anything sensuous and sexual in Hindu arts and literature.

The "Hindus were cowering under their scorn", states Doniger, and the open discussion of sex in the Kamasutra scandalized the 19th-century Europeans. Yet, states Doniger, it became soon after its publication in , "one of the most pirated books in the English language", widely copied, reprinted and republished sometimes without Richard Burton's name. Burton made two important contributions to the Kamasutra. First, he had the courage to publish it in the colonial era against the political and cultural mores of the British elite.

He creatively found a way to subvert the then prevalent censorship laws of Britain under the Obscene Publications Act of For example, the original Sanskrit Kamasutra does not use the words lingam or yoni for sexual organs, and almost always uses other terms.

Burton adroitly avoided being viewed as obscene to the Victorian mindset by avoiding the use of words such as penis, vulva, vagina and other direct or indirect sexual terms in the Sanskrit text to discuss sex, sexual relationships and human sexual positions. Burton used the terms lingam and yoni instead throughout the translation. However, Burton's Kamasutra gave a unique, specific meaning to these words in the western imagination.

The problems with Burton mistranslation are many, states Doniger. First, the text "simply does not say what Burton says it says". Third, it changes the force of words in the original text. For example, when a woman says "Stop! It has led to a misunderstanding of the text and created the wrong impression of it being ancient "Hindu pornography".

In , S. Upadhyaya published his translation as the Kamasutra of Vatsyayana: Complete Translation from the Original. He includes English translations of two important commentaries, one by Jayamangala commentary, and a more modern commentary by Devadatta Shastri, as endnotes. He, at times, reverses the object and subject, making the woman the subject and man the object when the Kamasutra is explicitly stating the reverse.

According to Doniger, "even this cryptic text [ Kamasutra ] is not infinitely elastic" and such creative reinterpretations do not reflect the text. A translation by Indra Sinha was published in In the early s, its chapter on sexual positions began circulating on the internet as an independent text and today is often assumed to be the whole of the Kama Sutra. Wendy Doniger and Sudhir Kakar published another translation in , as a part of the Oxford World's Classics series.

According to David Shulman, the Doniger translation "will change peoples' understanding of this book and of ancient India. Previous translations are hopelessly outdated, inadequate and misguided".

Her translation has the folksy, "twinkle prose", engaging style, and an original translation of the Sanskrit text. However, adds Sil, Doniger's work mixes her postmodern translation and interpretation of the text with her own "political and polemical" views. She makes sweeping generalizations and flippant insertions that are neither supported by the original text nor the weight of evidence in other related ancient and later Indian literature such as from the Bengal Renaissance movement — one of the scholarly specialty of Narasingha Sil.

Doniger's presentation style titillates, yet some details misinform and parts of her interpretations are dubious, states Sil. Indira Kapoor, a director of the International Planned Parenthood Foundation, states that the Kamasutra is a treatise on human sexual behavior and an ancient attempt to seriously study sexuality among other things. According to Kapoor, quotes Jyoti Puri, the attitude of contemporary Indians is markedly different, with misconceptions and expressions of embarrassment, rather than curiosity and pride, when faced with texts such as Kamasutra and amorous and erotic arts found in Hindu temples.

The Kamasutra has been a popular reference to erotic ancient literature. In the Western media, such as in the American women's magazine Redbook , the Kamasutra is described as "Although it was written centuries ago, there's still no better sex handbook, which details hundreds of positions, each offering a subtle variation in pleasure to men and women.

Jyoti Puri, who has published a review and feminist critique of the text, states that the " Kamasutra is frequently appropriated as indisputable evidence of a non-Western and tolerant, indeed celebratory, view of sexuality" and for "the belief that the Kamasutra provides a transparent glimpse into the positive, even exalted, view of sexuality".

These narratives neither resonate with nor provide the "politics of gender, race, nationality and class" in ancient India published by other historians and that may have been prevalent then.

According to Wendy Doniger, the Kamasutra is a "great cultural masterpiece", one which can inspire contemporary Indians to overcome "self-doubts and rejoice" in their ancient heritage. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article is about the ancient text. For other uses, see Kama Sutra disambiguation. On balance in life In any period of life in which one of the elements of the trivarga — dharma, artha, kama — is the primary one, the other two should be natural adjuncts of it.

On sexual embraces Some sexual embraces, not in this text, also intensify passion; these, too, may be used for love-making, but only with care. The first English version by Richard Burton became public in , but it was illegal to publish it in England and the United States till Gender and families. The Kenyon Review, New Series. Introduction, Sexuality Now: Embracing Diversity. Cengage Learning. Redeeming the Kamasutra. Oxford University Press.